R. Grant Ingram Series

R. Grant Ingram Distinguished Speakers Series

The R. Grant Ingram Distinguished Speaker Series was established by Dr. Helen Burt to honour Dr. R. Grant Ingram, the founding Principal of St. John’s College.  Visiting lecturers are invited to discuss the following themes: Indigenous issues, health, education, youth issues, housing, environment and sustainability, climate change, marine conservation, water resources, polar research, biodiversity, and women in science.

Dr. Ingram (1945 – 2007) was a distinguished physical oceanographer. In addition to his work as founding Principal of St. John’s College, he was Dean of Science Pro Tem, Strategic Planning and research in the Faculty of Science, and Principal of Interdisciplinary Studies.

Date: September 11, 2020
Time: 5:30pm-6:30pm via ZOOM

We invite you to watch the lecture recording below:

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The theme of the lecture this year is Science Communication and Dealing with Uncertainty in the Era of COVID-19. We are delighted to have as our speakers Dr. Heidi Tworek, Associate Professor in History/Public Policy and Global Affairs at the University of British Columbia, and Dr. Claire Wardle, co-founder and director of First Draft. This topic is timely given the global pandemic and the various responses from governments around the world. In the past nine months, what issues have we seen with COVID-19 communication or more broadly, science communication? As academics, what can we learn from the lessons of the past nine months and how do we engage more effectively in science communication in the future?

To attend the Ingram lecture via Zoom, please RSVP by August 31st through this link: https://ubc.ca1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_1Nvp3f5P4owcl6d. Please note that the lecture will be recorded for archival purposes and uploaded for viewing at a later date. In addition, SJC residents might have the opportunity to view the lecture via the TV system in the dining hall, subject to in-person gathering limitations and other social distancing considerations.

One segment of the lecture is dedicated to answering questions the audience might have regarding COVID-19 and science communication in general. If you have any questions you'd like to pose to the speakers, please submit them using the RSVP form and we'll pass them to the speakers in advance. In addition, current residents of SJC will have a chance to ask questions live or anonymously during the lecture. But please note that the lecture will be recorded, so your interaction with the speakers will be recorded if you choose to ask questions live.

2017 UBC Reads Sustainability with Duncan McCue

In partnership with UBC Reads Sustainability, the R. Grant Ingram Distinguished Speaker Series presents:

1. Lunch with Duncan McCue
November 27th, 12-1:30PM
St. John’s College, 2111 Lower Mall
Professionally catered lunch. No cost but registration required by November 23rd, 4:00pm.

In this moderated conversation, Duncan McCue will share his experience writing The Shoe Boy, a story of him discovering his Indigenous identity as a teenager, and his perspective on how connection to land and cultural identity are related to the world’s sustainability.

Learn more and register here: https://goo.gl/X5mbKr

2. Evening Book Club with Duncan McCue
November 28th, 5-6:30PM
St. John’s College, 2111 Lower Mall
Light snacks included. No cost but registration required by November 23rd, 4:00pm.

Join us for a casual evening with Duncan McCue. Share appetizers with Duncan McCue then get comfortable and listen in as Duncan McCue reads and speaks about his book, The Shoe Boy. The evening will end with book signing. *Books are available for purchase prior to the event at the UBC Bookstore and will be available for purchase with cash at the event.


September 30, 2016

“Who gets to decide? Balancing the potentials and risks of using genetic technology to tackle the great challenges facing the planet”

The human population size is expected to reach nearly 11 billion by 2100.

How can food production meet this challenge? Deadly diseases, including malaria, Zika, and dengue, kill half a million people worldwide, many of whom are children. What can be done to prevent the spread of these diseases? Global warming is causing shifts in environmental conditions at a rate of ~1000 meters per year. How can we conserve species that are becoming increasingly mismatched to their environment? As our knowledge of genomics has increased, new genetic technologies have emerged that can help tackle these challenges. Some involve genetic engineering, some not, but each raises its own social, ethical, and policy questions. Join us as we discuss these challenges and the implications of genetic approaches that could be used to tackle them.

 


October 25, 2013 "An Evening with Larry Grant", Elder Larry Grant

Elder Larry Grant

News Release

Program


September 26, 2011 "Seasons of the Arctic: An Inuit Perspective", Dr. SHARI GEARHEARD, ESA QILLAQ, and RAYGEE PALITUQ

Seasons of the Arctic


October 22, 2009 "Living Traditions: Windigo's and Indigenous Law" An Integrated Anishenabek Academic Story Dr. JOHN BORROWS, J.D., LL.M., Ph.D.

Program News Release